Bicyclist

The Division of Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation works closely with the Governor’s Highway Safety Program (GHSP), the University of North Carolina Highway Safety Research Center (HSRC), and North Carolina State University’s Institute for Transportation Research and Education (ITRE) to research and report on issues related to bicycle and pedestrian safety. This section describes some of the more recent research the Division has initiated with links to the full reports.

Crash Data Tool and Reports

Crash Data Tool Access Crash Data Tool

Crash Data Reports

NC Pedestrian Crash Facts Summary Report

NC Bicycle Crash Facts Summary Report

NC Pedestrian Crash Types Summary Report

NC Bicycle Crash Types Summary Report

In the past, collecting and analyzing crash data was a difficult and time-consuming process because there was no central location for information on pedestrian and bicycle crashes. Thanks to the capabilities of technology and investment by the Division of Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation, information from more than 9,000 recent bicycle and pedestrian crashes with motor vehicles has been compiled to create an interactive database that covers the whole state of North Carolina

This unique resource is designed for researching and analyzing bicycle and pedestrian crash data in North Carolina. The data bank allows queries of the cross-tabulated information by city, county, state, and other variables. For example, you can create your own tables of crash facts related to age, gender, race, injury severity, type of roadway, and type of crash for both bicyclist and pedestrian crashes.

Created and housed at the University of North Carolina Highway Safety Research Center, this resource puts important data at the fingertips of planners, engineers, government officials, and citizens who are interested in analyzing bicycle and pedestrian crashes in their communities.

The 2011 NC Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Survey & Summit

Summit Synthesis Report List Pdf in order below

Full Report (pdf)

Executive Summary (pdf)

Appendices (pdf)

The Division of Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation and the Institute of Transportation Research and Education conducted a statewide public survey to identify key problems and prioritize safety issues within North Carolina’s bicycle and pedestrian network, and to determine the level of public support for future investment in the state's bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure.

The 2011 Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Summit report outlines suggested strategies for implementation by NCDOT. The report is intended to serve as a planning resource wherever bicycle and pedestrian safety is concerned.

Two separate but related public involvement processes are the foundation of the report. The first was a widely distributed public questionnaire, which generated more than 16,000 responses. The second was a subsequent series of five regional roundtables held across the state. Ultimately, roundtable participants reached a consensus on the strategies to recommend to NCDOT through a process of priority voting.

Several themes clearly emerged through both of these processes. They included: making improvements to facilities; funding; policies, laws, and enforcement; intergovernmental cooperation; and education and public outreach.

Bicycle Helmet Research

Related Documents

A Statewide Survey of Bicycle Helmet Use in North Carolina (1999)

Helmet Use in North Carolina Following a Statewide Helmet Law (2002)

Child Bicycle Safety Act

In 1999, the University of North Carolina Highway Safety Research Center (HSRC) conducted a survey of bicycle helmet use in North Carolina for the Governor's Highway Safety Program.

The final report, A Statewide Survey of Bicycle Helmet Use in North Carolina, published in September of 1999, looks at variables in helmet usage according to region of the state, age of the cyclist, and the cycling location. The study also looked at types of helmet misuse.

A follow-up study was conducted in 2002 after passage of the Child Bicycle Safety Act in 2001 that requires all children under 16 to wear a bicycle helmet. This study, Helmet Use in North Carolina Following a Statewide Helmet Law, compares findings of current helmet usage to the earlier study.

School Walk Zone Study

The DBPT initiated a project to research the potential for development of standardized school walk zone policies for the state. The School Transportation Group of the Institute for Transportation Research and Education (ITRE) at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina Highway Safety Research Center (HSRC) were selected to undertake the study. The project resulted in the following activities:

Study Reports

Read the Summary Report

Read the Full Report

  • Compilation of the existing policies of North Carolina public schools for walk zones
  • Descriptions of the school commute patterns through surveys of all North Carolina Local Education Agencies (LEAs)
  • Analysis of North Carolina pedestrian/motor vehicle crash data
  • Focus group meetings with parents and school officials with transportation policy and operations responsibilities
  • A review of school walk zone guidelines, policies, and practices developed by other states and municipalities
  • The definition of focus areas and development of specific recommendations.

Statewide Survey on Bicycling and Walking

Survey Results

Survey Highlights

Report Summary

Full Summary

The DBPT is charged with improving the safety, access and mobility of bicyclists and pedestrians throughout the state.

In order to learn more about these user groups, their needs and their bicycling and walking activities, the DBPT worked with the University of North Carolina Highway Safety Research Center in 2000 to gather data that would provide a "snapshot" of the status of bicycling and walking in North Carolina.

Economic Impact of Investing in Bicycle Facilities: A Case Study

In the summer of 2003, the North Carolina Department of Transportation Division of Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation (DBPT) commissioned a study to assess the value of their investment in bicycle facilities. The Institute for Transportation Research and Education (ITRE) at North Carolina State University conducted the study in the northern Outer Banks region because of its existing high levels of bicycling activity and presence of an extensive system of special bicycle facilities. Researchers surveyed bicyclists riding on the bicycle facilities — paths and wide paved shoulders — and also obtained data from self-administered surveys of tourists at three visitors’ centers in the region.

Related Documents

View Map of the Study Area

Pathways to Prosperity Brochure

Study Overview

Over the ten years prior to the study, an estimated $6.7 million of public funds was spent to construct off-road paths and add wide paved shoulders to roads in the region, from Corolla south to Nags Head and west to Manteo.

Economic Impact Study Conclusions

  • Bicycling activity in the northern Outer Banks provides substantial economic benefits to the area — an estimated $60 million annually.
  • The bicycle facilities in the area are an important factor for many tourists in deciding to visit the region.
  • Three-fourths of study respondents indicated that more bicycle facilities should be built, and nine out of 10 surveyed believe state and federal tax dollars should be used to do it.

Full Technical Report

The Full Technical Report PDF is 95 pages, and 3.3mb in file size. You can also view it in individual sections.